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Lifestyle intervention for overweight pregnant women.

February 6, 2017

Dr. Fox responds to an article:
Lifestyle intervention for overweight pregnant women.
 
Yet another example of misguided nutritional research. Likely a good study but the conclusions are going to echo the numerous studies that damage the healthcare of patients everywhere. This group took the DASH diet (see below) and applied it to overweight pregnant women to control “weight gain” and better the overall outcome of pregnancy. They showed lower weight gain but no change in outcome. What the overall take away by medicine translates into, it doesn’t matter if we spend all that extra time with patients trying to help them control weight gain in pregnancy because the outcome is the same. No one will dream of questioning the underlying diet itself which was doomed to fail from the outset.
 
DASH diet was originally designed to lower blood pressure based primarily on a low sodium approach. We know that insulin causes sodium retention and therefore increases in blood pressure. Take insulin away and blood pressure PLUMMETS!! Also without insulin, we have to supplement sodium because deficiency ensues. This diet is high in grains and fruits, lean meats and low in fats and promotes healthy fats such as plant based oils. So a high carb low fat and low calorie diet approach although the calorie restriction part would have been somewhat suspended for the pregnant patients.
 
The scientific community and the government continues to completely ignore the obvious: carbohydrates are the problem and saturated animal fats are a large part of the answer??
 
DASH:
Type of food
 
Servings on a 2000 Calorie diet
Grains and grain products
(include at least 3 whole grain foods each day)
 
7 – 8
Fruits
 
4 – 5
Vegetables
 
4 – 5
Low fat or non fat dairy foods
 
2 – 3
Lean meats, fish, poultry
 
2 or less
Nuts, seeds, and legumes
 
4 – 5 per week
Fats and sweets
2 – 4
 
Michael D. Fox, MD
Jacksonville Center
Reproductive Medicine
www.JCRM.org
http://www.healio.com/family-medicine/gynecology-obstetrics/news/online/%7Be3b23374-9ef4-4828-b439-48769679088c%7D/lifestyle-interventions-may-not-be-enough-to-prevent-pregnancy-complications-in-overweight-women

   
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